ECLAC foresees third year of decline in exports from Latin America and the Caribbean

20 October 2015

Exports from Latin America and the Caribbean will decline in 2015, for the third consecutive year, with a contraction of -14%, according to a report by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) presented today in Mexico City.

The new projections indicate that sharp falls in raw material prices and a reduction in international demand for products from the region affected performance in this field.

According to the study, the 2013-2015 triennium has been the worst in eight decades for the region’s exports.

ECLAC anticipated that 2016 will be another negative year and a further decline is expected as the sector’s recovery prospects for next year are bleak.

The executive secretary of ECLAC, Alicia Bárcena, stressed during the presentation of the report that Latin America and the Caribbean are at a crossroads that forces them to continue on the current path, restricted by the global context, or to assume commitments to a better international insertion.

In this sense, the senior official recommended giving priority to industrial policy, diversification, trade facilities and intra-regional integration.

20 October 2015

Exports from Latin America and the Caribbean will decline in 2015, for the third consecutive year, with a contraction of -14%, according to a report by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) presented today in Mexico City.

The new projections indicate that sharp falls in raw material prices and a reduction in international demand for products from the region affected performance in this field.

According to the study, the 2013-2015 triennium has been the worst in eight decades for the region’s exports.

ECLAC anticipated that 2016 will be another negative year and a further decline is expected as the sector’s recovery prospects for next year are bleak.

The executive secretary of ECLAC, Alicia Bárcena, stressed during the presentation of the report that Latin America and the Caribbean are at a crossroads that forces them to continue on the current path, restricted by the global context, or to assume commitments to a better international insertion.

In this sense, the senior official recommended giving priority to industrial policy, diversification, trade facilities and intra-regional integration.