Ecuador affirms that overcoming poverty is the greatest moral imperative on the planet

September 29, 2015

The president of Ecuador, Rafael Correa, stated at the UN that overcoming poverty is the greatest moral imperative that the planet has, since it is not the result of scarcity of resources but of unjust and exclusive systems.

“The 164 million people in Latin America who live in poverty, of which 68 million continue in extreme poverty, still await justice, freedom and a real democracy, not just reduced to having periodic elections.”

Correa participated on Monday night in the annual debate held these days by the General Assembly and a large part of his speech was devoted to development issues, climate, migration and work.

The Ecuadorian president pointed out that the solution “is not more borders”, but solidarity and creating conditions of prosperity and peace that discourage people from emigrating.

Regarding climate change, he celebrated that this issue has been included in the Sustainable Development agenda for the next fifteen years and considered it necessary to move towards a Universal Declaration of the Rights of Nature.

“Conservation in poor countries will not be possible if it does not generate clear and direct improvements in the standard of living of its population,” said Correa.

He also alluded to various international issues and pointed out that his country looks forward to the reestablishment of relations between Cuba and the United States and hopes that this will lead to the end of the embargo. In addition, he welcomed the recent agreements between the Government of Colombia and the FARC, and expressed the solidarity of his country with the Syrian people.

The president of Ecuador finally alluded to the contamination left by the Texaco oil company, which operated in the Amazon until 1992 and was acquired by Chevron in 2001.

He recalled the arduous legal dispute that this matter has generated in Ecuadorian and US courts and asked the member states to draw up a binding treaty to punish transnational companies when they violate human rights or contaminate the environment.

September 29, 2015

The president of Ecuador, Rafael Correa, stated at the UN that overcoming poverty is the greatest moral imperative that the planet has, since it is not the result of scarcity of resources but of unjust and exclusive systems.

“The 164 million people in Latin America who live in poverty, of which 68 million continue in extreme poverty, still await justice, freedom and a real democracy, not just reduced to having periodic elections.”

Correa participated on Monday night in the annual debate held these days by the General Assembly and a large part of his speech was devoted to development issues, climate, migration and work.

The Ecuadorian president pointed out that the solution “is not more borders”, but solidarity and creating conditions of prosperity and peace that discourage people from emigrating.

Regarding climate change, he celebrated that this issue has been included in the Sustainable Development agenda for the next fifteen years and considered it necessary to move towards a Universal Declaration of the Rights of Nature.

“Conservation in poor countries will not be possible if it does not generate clear and direct improvements in the standard of living of its population,” said Correa.

He also alluded to various international issues and pointed out that his country looks forward to the reestablishment of relations between Cuba and the United States and hopes that this will lead to the end of the embargo. In addition, he welcomed the recent agreements between the Government of Colombia and the FARC, and expressed the solidarity of his country with the Syrian people.

The president of Ecuador finally alluded to the contamination left by the Texaco oil company, which operated in the Amazon until 1992 and was acquired by Chevron in 2001.

He recalled the arduous legal dispute that this matter has generated in Ecuadorian and US courts and asked the member states to draw up a binding treaty to punish transnational companies when they violate human rights or contaminate the environment.