World Bank says extreme poverty will soon be less than 10% of the world’s population

5 October 2015

For the first time in history, less than 10% of the world’s population will live in extreme poverty, the World Bank announced on Monday.

The financial body made this statement when presenting new projections and stressed that what has been achieved is testimony to the sustained reduction of poverty over a quarter of a century.

The news was accompanied by the establishment of a new poverty line, which changed from $ 1.25 a day to $ 1.90. Thus, the World Bank estimates that the population in extreme poverty will be reduced to 702 million in 2015, which is approximately 9.6% of the planet’s inhabitants.

In 2012, there were 902 million people who lived in this condition.

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim stated that “these projections demonstrate that we are the first generation in human history that can end extreme poverty.”

The international institution highlighted how the concentration of global poverty in the last two decades has moved from Asia to Sub-Saharan Africa.

According to the document, in Latin America, extreme poverty has gone from 6.2% to 5.6%.

5 October 2015

For the first time in history, less than 10% of the world’s population will live in extreme poverty, the World Bank announced on Monday.

The financial body made this statement when presenting new projections and stressed that what has been achieved is testimony to the sustained reduction of poverty over a quarter of a century.

The news was accompanied by the establishment of a new poverty line, which changed from $ 1.25 a day to $ 1.90. Thus, the World Bank estimates that the population in extreme poverty will be reduced to 702 million in 2015, which is approximately 9.6% of the planet’s inhabitants.

In 2012, there were 902 million people who lived in this condition.

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim stated that “these projections demonstrate that we are the first generation in human history that can end extreme poverty.”

The international institution highlighted how the concentration of global poverty in the last two decades has moved from Asia to Sub-Saharan Africa.

According to the document, in Latin America, extreme poverty has gone from 6.2% to 5.6%.