Asia-Pacific trade loses steam due to global economic slowdown

2 November 2015

Asia-Pacific continues to be the most dynamic region in the global economy, but growth in regional trade and the flow of investment are slowing down, the UN Economic Commission for Asia-Pacific (ESCAP) warned today in a report.

The study emphasizes that countries must adapt to cyclical and structural changes, especially in view of the global slowdown and the expected reduction in China’s growth rate.

The region’s exports and imports registered a rise of just 1.6 percent in 2014. However, when China is excluded from the regional total, exports fell 0.4 percent, the report said.

The weakness of trade and the volume of investments in the region is having a negative impact on the forecasts of a short-term recovery.

During the presentation of the study in Bangkok, ESCAP Executive Secretary Samsahd Akhtar highlighted the importance of resuscitating trade and investment at a time when Member States supported their role in implementing the new Sustainable Development Goals.

Despite the less encouraging outlook, Asia-Pacific is likely to continue to maintain its position as the world’s largest trading region. In 2014, it accounted for nearly 40 percent of global exports and imports.

2 November 2015

Asia-Pacific continues to be the most dynamic region in the global economy, but growth in regional trade and the flow of investment are slowing down, the UN Economic Commission for Asia-Pacific (ESCAP) warned today in a report.

The study emphasizes that countries must adapt to cyclical and structural changes, especially in view of the global slowdown and the expected reduction in China’s growth rate.

The region’s exports and imports registered a rise of just 1.6 percent in 2014. However, when China is excluded from the regional total, exports fell 0.4 percent, the report said.

The weakness of trade and the volume of investments in the region is having a negative impact on the forecasts of a short-term recovery.

During the presentation of the study in Bangkok, ESCAP Executive Secretary Samsahd Akhtar highlighted the importance of resuscitating trade and investment at a time when Member States supported their role in implementing the new Sustainable Development Goals.

Despite the less encouraging outlook, Asia-Pacific is likely to continue to maintain its position as the world’s largest trading region. In 2014, it accounted for nearly 40 percent of global exports and imports.