FAO calls for policies and investment to adapt agriculture to climate change

October 14, 2015

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) called today to design policies and investments aimed at adapting agriculture to the effects of climate change.

Reducing deforestation and overexploitation of fishing, improving soil fertility and reducing polluting emissions are some of the measures that could contribute to this adaptation.

The Director General of FAO, José Graziano da Silva and the Minister of Agriculture of France, Stéphane Le Foll, discussed this and other issues during a meeting within the framework of the sessions of the Committee on World Food Security, which are held in Rome .

Both demanded that food security and agriculture be at the center of debates related to climate change and urged countries to reach an agreement on this matter at the December summit in Paris.

Graziano da Silva stressed that climate change is already affecting food security and makes eradicating hunger more difficult. He also stressed that the most vulnerable and poor people, the vast majority of whom live in rural areas, are the ones who suffer the most from the negative effects of this phenomenon, such as droughts and floods.

Farmers, fishermen and other rural communities are highly dependent on natural resources for their subsistence and “they are the least responsible for climate change, and we cannot expect them to bear the costs of adaptation,” emphasized the FAO Director-General.

October 14, 2015

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) called today to design policies and investments aimed at adapting agriculture to the effects of climate change.

Reducing deforestation and overexploitation of fishing, improving soil fertility and reducing polluting emissions are some of the measures that could contribute to this adaptation.

The Director General of FAO, José Graziano da Silva and the Minister of Agriculture of France, Stéphane Le Foll, discussed this and other issues during a meeting within the framework of the sessions of the Committee on World Food Security, which are held in Rome .

Both demanded that food security and agriculture be at the center of debates related to climate change and urged countries to reach an agreement on this matter at the December summit in Paris.

Graziano da Silva stressed that climate change is already affecting food security and makes eradicating hunger more difficult. He also stressed that the most vulnerable and poor people, the vast majority of whom live in rural areas, are the ones who suffer the most from the negative effects of this phenomenon, such as droughts and floods.

Farmers, fishermen and other rural communities are highly dependent on natural resources for their subsistence and “they are the least responsible for climate change, and we cannot expect them to bear the costs of adaptation,” emphasized the FAO Director-General.