ILO notes that youth unemployment remains high globally

8 October 2015

The International Labor Organization (ILO) reported today that the youth unemployment rate in the world remains well above the levels prior to the global crisis that began in 2007 and that it is still difficult for millions of young people to access the labor market.

In a report, the ILO found that the youth unemployment rate has stabilized at around 13 percent since 2010 and it is estimated that in 2014 there were some 73.3 million young people without work, 3.3 million less than at the lowest point. peak of the crisis in 2009.

This decrease could be due to the fact that more young people are now studying for longer, or do not register as unemployed, or because of greater geographical mobility, among other factors.

The ILO explained that the youth unemployment rate in developed countries and the European Union fell by 1.4 percent last year compared to 2012 and by 0.5 percent or less in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa Sub-Saharan and other European regions. In the rest of the world it increased or did not vary substantially in the same period.

The study also reveals that job recovery is highly uneven after the crisis and remains slower and more precarious in developing or low-income countries. In the richest, despite the economic improvement in recent years, young people continue to find many difficulties in accessing a job and keeping it stable.

“One in three unemployed young people have been looking for work for more than a year and are in danger of being left behind while the economy recovers, unless they are offered specific attention to find work,” Azita said at a press conference. Berar, Director of the ILO Employment Policy Department.

The ILO also found that millions of young people in low-income countries continue to leave school at an early age to work. Furthermore, the gap between the participation of girls and boys in the labor market persists.

The ILO emphasized that more should be invested in quality education and training to enable young people to benefit from the demands of the labor market, with due protection and without discrimination between genders.

He also advocates for more actions specifically aimed at promoting youth employment.

8 October 2015

The International Labor Organization (ILO) reported today that the youth unemployment rate in the world remains well above the levels prior to the global crisis that began in 2007 and that it is still difficult for millions of young people to access the labor market.

In a report, the ILO found that the youth unemployment rate has stabilized at around 13 percent since 2010 and it is estimated that in 2014 there were some 73.3 million young people without work, 3.3 million less than at the lowest point. peak of the crisis in 2009.

This decrease could be due to the fact that more young people are now studying for longer, or do not register as unemployed, or because of greater geographical mobility, among other factors.

The ILO explained that the youth unemployment rate in developed countries and the European Union fell by 1.4 percent last year compared to 2012 and by 0.5 percent or less in Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa Sub-Saharan and other European regions. In the rest of the world it increased or did not vary substantially in the same period.

The study also reveals that job recovery is highly uneven after the crisis and remains slower and more precarious in developing or low-income countries. In the richest, despite the economic improvement in recent years, young people continue to find many difficulties in accessing a job and keeping it stable.

“One in three unemployed young people have been looking for work for more than a year and are in danger of being left behind while the economy recovers, unless they are offered specific attention to find work,” Azita said at a press conference. Berar, Director of the ILO Employment Policy Department.

The ILO also found that millions of young people in low-income countries continue to leave school at an early age to work. Furthermore, the gap between the participation of girls and boys in the labor market persists.

The ILO emphasized that more should be invested in quality education and training to enable young people to benefit from the demands of the labor market, with due protection and without discrimination between genders.

He also advocates for more actions specifically aimed at promoting youth employment.