23 October 2015

Indigenous peoples believe that the Sustainable Development Agenda for 2030 can contribute to improving their living conditions and having their rights more firmly recognized, but that will require more support for their claims and a more rigorous collection of information on these communities.

A group of experts have debated at the UN these and other issues related to the issues that most concern indigenous populations, including the more than 800 communities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Economic Commission for that region, ECLAC, also participates in these debates. Fabiana del Popolo, an expert in the Population Division of that UN agency, highlighted in statements to UN Radio that the agenda adopted by the member states on September 25 represents progress with respect to the objectives that were set for the last fifteen years , although much remains to be done in terms of the full recognition of indigenous rights.

“Unlike the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that made no mention of indigenous peoples, at least in some Goals indigenous peoples are now mentioned. Before they were invisible @, said this expert.

“However, it is not enough and it does not reflect the aspirations of indigenous peoples, especially in relation to their collective rights. It is necessary to see how the recognition of collective rights that are already enshrined in international standards is included in the implementation of the SDGs ”, he added.

He explained that in a region as diverse as Latin America, the legal frameworks of the countries also reflect the differences between countries in addressing indigenous issues, as well as in the funds allocated to implement policies that affect them.

However, he pointed out that there is a common characteristic to the entire region and that is the progressive strengthening of indigenous organizations and the overlapping demands they pose.

Fabiana del Popolo also highlighted the importance that ECLAC gives to the inclusion of the identity of indigenous peoples in population censuses and other databases and added that this is an insistent demand of the communities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

23 October 2015

Indigenous peoples believe that the Sustainable Development Agenda for 2030 can contribute to improving their living conditions and having their rights more firmly recognized, but that will require more support for their claims and a more rigorous collection of information on these communities.

A group of experts have debated at the UN these and other issues related to the issues that most concern indigenous populations, including the more than 800 communities in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Economic Commission for that region, ECLAC, also participates in these debates. Fabiana del Popolo, an expert in the Population Division of that UN agency, highlighted in statements to UN Radio that the agenda adopted by the member states on September 25 represents progress with respect to the objectives that were set for the last fifteen years , although much remains to be done in terms of the full recognition of indigenous rights.

“Unlike the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that made no mention of indigenous peoples, at least in some Goals indigenous peoples are now mentioned. Before they were invisible @, said this expert.

“However, it is not enough and it does not reflect the aspirations of indigenous peoples, especially in relation to their collective rights. It is necessary to see how the recognition of collective rights that are already enshrined in international standards is included in the implementation of the SDGs ”, he added.

He explained that in a region as diverse as Latin America, the legal frameworks of the countries also reflect the differences between countries in addressing indigenous issues, as well as in the funds allocated to implement policies that affect them.

However, he pointed out that there is a common characteristic to the entire region and that is the progressive strengthening of indigenous organizations and the overlapping demands they pose.

Fabiana del Popolo also highlighted the importance that ECLAC gives to the inclusion of the identity of indigenous peoples in population censuses and other databases and added that this is an insistent demand of the communities in Latin America and the Caribbean.