3 June 2020
Human rights

A human rights rapporteur assures that the plan will provide relief to people in need and encourages the government to continue expanding that coverage while calling for the eligibility and bureaucratic requirements to be reduced. He also recalls that despite the economic recovery experienced after the 2008-2011 crisis, inequality in Spain has remained well above the European Union averages.

The new minimum vital income approved in Spain shows how States can take advantage of the economic crisis caused by the global pandemic of COVID-19 to fight poverty and reduce inequality, has assured the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and the human rights.

“The plan will provide much-needed relief to those in need and is a great example of how to develop an inclusive approach to address poverty and inequality,” said Olivier De Schutter.

Public spending on social protection right now is a crucial investment whose impacts will last for years to come.

The national “minimum vital income” plan is expected to reach more than 850,000 households and benefit 1.6 million people living in extreme poverty. Beneficiary households would receive from 451.5 to 1,015 euros, depending on the size of the family.

I encourage the Spanish Government to continue expanding the coverage of this program and to reduce the eligibility and bureaucratic requirements ”, added the expert.

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Bassam Khawaja
A neighborhood of the city of Mérica, in the Spanish community of Extremadura.

Expense not investment

De Schutter indicated that “public spending on social protection right now is a crucial investment whose impacts will last for years to come.”

For this reason, he pointed out that “it is essential that the plan is designed to reach as many people in need as possible“.

“The eligibility conditions they must not exclude particularly vulnerable people, such as undocumented or recently documented migrants, newly emancipated youth who were previously under public guardianship, homeless or permanent homeless, or people with unacknowledged disabilities who cannot work, “he added.

De Schutter explained that bureaucratic hurdles can be a major obstacle for people living in poverty who depend on government aid for their survival.

For this reason, “it is important develop a robust scheme that allows sufficient flexibility when people experiencing extreme poverty cannot easily meet all documentation requirements ”.

Despite the economic recovery experienced after the 2008-2011 crisis, inequality in Spain has remained well above the averages for the European Union and Autonomous minimum income regimes have been largely inadequate.

Former Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, Philip Alston, raised the issue of the national minimum living income plan at the end of his visit to Spain. The full report on his visit will be presented at the 44th session of the Human Rights Council in June 2020.

3 June 2020
Human rights

A human rights rapporteur assures that the plan will provide relief to people in need and encourages the government to continue expanding that coverage while calling for the eligibility and bureaucratic requirements to be reduced. He also recalls that despite the economic recovery experienced after the 2008-2011 crisis, inequality in Spain has remained well above the European Union averages.

The new minimum vital income approved in Spain shows how States can take advantage of the economic crisis caused by the global pandemic of COVID-19 to fight poverty and reduce inequality, has assured the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and the human rights.

“The plan will provide much-needed relief to those in need and is a great example of how to develop an inclusive approach to address poverty and inequality,” said Olivier De Schutter.

Public spending on social protection right now is a crucial investment whose impacts will last for years to come.

The national “minimum vital income” plan is expected to reach more than 850,000 households and benefit 1.6 million people living in extreme poverty. Beneficiary households would receive from 451.5 to 1,015 euros, depending on the size of the family.

I encourage the Spanish Government to continue expanding the coverage of this program and to reduce the eligibility and bureaucratic requirements ”, added the expert.

[Descarga nuestra aplicación Noticias ONU para IOS o Android. O subscríbete a nuestro boletín.]

Bassam Khawaja
A neighborhood of the city of Mérica, in the Spanish community of Extremadura.

Expense not investment

De Schutter indicated that “public spending on social protection right now is a crucial investment whose impacts will last for years to come.”

For this reason, he pointed out that “it is essential that the plan is designed to reach as many people in need as possible“.

“The eligibility conditions they must not exclude particularly vulnerable people, such as undocumented or recently documented migrants, newly emancipated youth who were previously under public guardianship, homeless or permanent homeless, or people with unacknowledged disabilities who cannot work, “he added.

De Schutter explained that bureaucratic hurdles can be a major obstacle for people living in poverty who depend on government aid for their survival.

For this reason, “it is important develop a robust scheme that allows sufficient flexibility when people experiencing extreme poverty cannot easily meet all documentation requirements ”.

Despite the economic recovery experienced after the 2008-2011 crisis, inequality in Spain has remained well above the averages for the European Union and Autonomous minimum income regimes have been largely inadequate.

Former Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights, Philip Alston, raised the issue of the national minimum living income plan at the end of his visit to Spain. The full report on his visit will be presented at the 44th session of the Human Rights Council in June 2020.