The number of people over 60 will double by 2050

30 September 2015

The World Health Organization (WHO) released a report today stating that the number of people over the age of 60 by the year 2050 is expected to be double the current figure, largely due to medical advances, which it will require drastic changes in societies.

However, longevity, which is also present in poor countries, does not necessarily mean that those extra years are lived in a healthy and dignified way. This was highlighted by Dr. John Beard, a WHO expert.

“Although many people think that those extra years of life indicate better health and it is said that the 70s are the new 60s, we haven’t got there yet. There is little evidence for that, that we live longer and healthier lives. But it could be like this and it should be like this ”, said the doctor in the presentation of the report, the first that the WHO carries out on aging and health.

The document underscores the need for governments to implement policies that allow older people to continue participating in society and thus not reinforce the inequities that often affect the health of the elderly.

The stereotype that the elderly are necessarily fragile and dependent is also rejected, thus disregarding the contributions they still make and can make to the family, communities and society.

It also highlights that policies should not place so much emphasis on cost control and focus more on older people doing those things that are most important to them, especially in the case of women, who are the majority among the population sector. older.

The report identifies three areas in particular where a change is required in the way society views aging and older people. One of them is to adapt the spaces to the lifestyles of these people and also to readjust the health systems to better meet the needs of the elderly.

In addition, governments must design systems that favor the provision of long-term care for the elderly and that help families to care for them, thereby also reducing the inappropriate use of other emergency services.

30 September 2015

The World Health Organization (WHO) released a report today stating that the number of people over the age of 60 by the year 2050 is expected to be double the current figure, largely due to medical advances, which it will require drastic changes in societies.

However, longevity, which is also present in poor countries, does not necessarily mean that those extra years are lived in a healthy and dignified way. This was highlighted by Dr. John Beard, a WHO expert.

“Although many people think that those extra years of life indicate better health and it is said that the 70s are the new 60s, we haven’t got there yet. There is little evidence for that, that we live longer and healthier lives. But it could be like this and it should be like this ”, said the doctor in the presentation of the report, the first that the WHO carries out on aging and health.

The document underscores the need for governments to implement policies that allow older people to continue participating in society and thus not reinforce the inequities that often affect the health of the elderly.

The stereotype that the elderly are necessarily fragile and dependent is also rejected, thus disregarding the contributions they still make and can make to the family, communities and society.

It also highlights that policies should not place so much emphasis on cost control and focus more on older people doing those things that are most important to them, especially in the case of women, who are the majority among the population sector. older.

The report identifies three areas in particular where a change is required in the way society views aging and older people. One of them is to adapt the spaces to the lifestyles of these people and also to readjust the health systems to better meet the needs of the elderly.

In addition, governments must design systems that favor the provision of long-term care for the elderly and that help families to care for them, thereby also reducing the inappropriate use of other emergency services.