UN delegation is satisfied with the progress of the dialogue between Guyana and Venezuela due to the border conflict

15 October 2015

The chief of staff Susana Malcorra led a United Nations mission to Georgetown, capital of Guyana, on October 12 and to Caracas, in Venezuela, on October 13 and 14.

During the visits, the UN delegation met with President David Granger of Guyana and President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela, as well as with the foreign ministers and other government representatives of both countries.

The objective of the meeting was to continue the dialogue to solve the border controversy between Guyana and Venezuela. This visit was part of the steps agreed during the trilateral meeting between the presidents and the UN Secretary General on September 27, within the framework of the General Assembly.

Malcorra applauded that diplomatic relations have been resumed and said she was satisfied with the progress towards a solution that is beneficial to both parties.

The disputed area is the Essequibo, a strip of 160,000 square kilometers rich in natural resources that has been under UN mediation for more than 50 years.

The conflict between the two countries resurfaced when the oil company Exxon Mobil discovered oil reserves in the waters of the disputed area in May. Venezuela demands about 40 percent of the territory from Guyana.

15 October 2015

The chief of staff Susana Malcorra led a United Nations mission to Georgetown, capital of Guyana, on October 12 and to Caracas, in Venezuela, on October 13 and 14.

During the visits, the UN delegation met with President David Granger of Guyana and President Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela, as well as with the foreign ministers and other government representatives of both countries.

The objective of the meeting was to continue the dialogue to solve the border controversy between Guyana and Venezuela. This visit was part of the steps agreed during the trilateral meeting between the presidents and the UN Secretary General on September 27, within the framework of the General Assembly.

Malcorra applauded that diplomatic relations have been resumed and said she was satisfied with the progress towards a solution that is beneficial to both parties.

The disputed area is the Essequibo, a strip of 160,000 square kilometers rich in natural resources that has been under UN mediation for more than 50 years.

The conflict between the two countries resurfaced when the oil company Exxon Mobil discovered oil reserves in the waters of the disputed area in May. Venezuela demands about 40 percent of the territory from Guyana.