UN Rapporteur will assess the situation of indigenous peoples in Honduras

30 October 2015

The UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, will make her first official visit to Honduras from November 2 to 10, with the aim of learning about the situation of indigenous peoples in that country. Central American.

The Rapporteur plans to meet with indigenous representatives, civil society organizations, and government officials. He will also travel to Puerto Lempira, Auka, La Esperanza, Río Blanco and La Ceiba, where he will hold meetings with local officials and indigenous organizations to discuss issues related to the protection of their lands, natural resources and livelihoods.

It will also assess the impacts of extractive, energy and other activities on the lands of indigenous peoples, as well as other issues related to violence and access to justice, and economic and social development.

“I hope that this visit will contribute to raising awareness about the problems that indigenous peoples experience on a daily basis and that remain largely ignored,” Tauli-Corpuz said in a statement.

“My visit will also try to promote solutions so that indigenous peoples can effectively enjoy their collective and individual rights,” the rapporteur added.

This would be the first visit to Honduras by an independent expert commissioned by the Human Rights Council to monitor, report and advise on the rights of indigenous peoples around the world.

The Special Rapporteur will present her report to that UN body next year with her conclusions and recommendations on the issues analyzed in this mission.

30 October 2015

The UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, will make her first official visit to Honduras from November 2 to 10, with the aim of learning about the situation of indigenous peoples in that country. Central American.

The Rapporteur plans to meet with indigenous representatives, civil society organizations, and government officials. He will also travel to Puerto Lempira, Auka, La Esperanza, Río Blanco and La Ceiba, where he will hold meetings with local officials and indigenous organizations to discuss issues related to the protection of their lands, natural resources and livelihoods.

It will also assess the impacts of extractive, energy and other activities on the lands of indigenous peoples, as well as other issues related to violence and access to justice, and economic and social development.

“I hope that this visit will contribute to raising awareness about the problems that indigenous peoples experience on a daily basis and that remain largely ignored,” Tauli-Corpuz said in a statement.

“My visit will also try to promote solutions so that indigenous peoples can effectively enjoy their collective and individual rights,” the rapporteur added.

This would be the first visit to Honduras by an independent expert commissioned by the Human Rights Council to monitor, report and advise on the rights of indigenous peoples around the world.

The Special Rapporteur will present her report to that UN body next year with her conclusions and recommendations on the issues analyzed in this mission.