October 14, 2015

The UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) reported today that during the decade from 2005 to 2014, international transport costs were similar to 9% of the value of imports from countries.

According to its Maritime Transport Review 2015, technological advances, economies of scale, the facilitation of transport, as well as the existence of more fuel-efficient ships, have contributed to the downward trend in costs of this type. Of transport.

However, the study affirms that African countries did not benefit from these advances and paid an average of 11% of the value of their imports.

With regard to Latin America and the Caribbean, the director of the UNCTAD Trade Facilitation Section, Jan Hoffmann, affirmed that the countries of the continent have had better results than the island ones.

“Most of the Latin American countries benefit, there are larger ships and better connectivity is observed,” he said.

However, he explained that the Caribbean islands are forced to pay higher freights because they do not have enough cargo volume and because the ships are larger, in addition to the fact that the industry focuses on a few companies and leaves them options.

The study indicates, on the other hand, that the world merchant fleet grew by 3.5% last year, the lowest annual advance in a decade. At the beginning of 2015, that fleet numbered about 90,000 vessels.

He also points out that despite its economic problems, Greece continues to be the country with the most ships in the world and that its companies comprise 16% of the world industry, followed by those of Japan, China, Germany and Singapore.

October 14, 2015

The UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) reported today that during the decade from 2005 to 2014, international transport costs were similar to 9% of the value of imports from countries.

According to its Maritime Transport Review 2015, technological advances, economies of scale, the facilitation of transport, as well as the existence of more fuel-efficient ships, have contributed to the downward trend in costs of this type. Of transport.

However, the study affirms that African countries did not benefit from these advances and paid an average of 11% of the value of their imports.

With regard to Latin America and the Caribbean, the director of the UNCTAD Trade Facilitation Section, Jan Hoffmann, affirmed that the countries of the continent have had better results than the island ones.

“Most of the Latin American countries benefit, there are larger ships and better connectivity is observed,” he said.

However, he explained that the Caribbean islands are forced to pay higher freights because they do not have enough cargo volume and because the ships are larger, in addition to the fact that the industry focuses on a few companies and leaves them options.

The study indicates, on the other hand, that the world merchant fleet grew by 3.5% last year, the lowest annual advance in a decade. At the beginning of 2015, that fleet numbered about 90,000 vessels.

He also points out that despite its economic problems, Greece continues to be the country with the most ships in the world and that its companies comprise 16% of the world industry, followed by those of Japan, China, Germany and Singapore.