WHO urges world leaders to reach a climate agreement

6 October 2015

The World Health Organization (WHO) today highlighted the detrimental effects of climate change on everyone’s health and called on health professionals to unite their voices and demand a universal agreement on climate at the conference to be held in December in Paris.

The WHO recalled that health professionals are on the front line to protect citizens from climate impacts and attend to outbreaks of infectious diseases associated with it, including malaria, dengue or cholera. In this sense, he highlighted that 2015 is already the hottest year on record so far.

Reaching an agreement in Paris on the climate, “may also be the most important commitment in terms of health in this entire century,” the WHO said in a statement.

He added that this appointment can be an opportunity, not only to reduce climate change and its consequences, but also to promote actions that can generate short and long-term health benefits and reduce costs for health systems and communities.

The WHO advocated for an agreement that promotes strong and effective actions to mitigate climate change and its risks, and that increases financing to adapt and reduce the effects of extreme natural events on health.

6 October 2015

The World Health Organization (WHO) today highlighted the detrimental effects of climate change on everyone’s health and called on health professionals to unite their voices and demand a universal agreement on climate at the conference to be held in December in Paris.

The WHO recalled that health professionals are on the front line to protect citizens from climate impacts and attend to outbreaks of infectious diseases associated with it, including malaria, dengue or cholera. In this sense, he highlighted that 2015 is already the hottest year on record so far.

Reaching an agreement in Paris on the climate, “may also be the most important commitment in terms of health in this entire century,” the WHO said in a statement.

He added that this appointment can be an opportunity, not only to reduce climate change and its consequences, but also to promote actions that can generate short and long-term health benefits and reduce costs for health systems and communities.

The WHO advocated for an agreement that promotes strong and effective actions to mitigate climate change and its risks, and that increases financing to adapt and reduce the effects of extreme natural events on health.